Fjällsäter

 

WelcomeBack in October I met a woman at the Brunskog market who was selling her luffarslöjd, wire baskets and art.  I asked if she would be interested in teaching me how to do it, and she agreed.  Today, I spent a wonderful day at their farm in the forest, Fjallsäter.  It is thought that the farm was built in 1880 and was a working farm, complete with separate buildings, each for a special job: weaving,  blacksmith, stable,  and carpenter.  It was an active farm until the 1960’s when it became a summer cabin, ultimately deserted.  Sofia, my teacher and her husband, Jacob moved into the farm in 2003.  They have amazing plans for restoration, including a guest house and the opportunity to reconnect with nature.  Jacob, originally from Denmark, is a restorer of old log buildings.  

 

The view into the farm.

The view into the farm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sofia, their daughter Lovissa and their home.

Sofia, their daughter Lovissa and their home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacob letting the Värmlands forest sheep, a heritage breed, out into the field for the first time this spring.

Jacob letting the Värmlands forest sheep, a heritage breed, out into the field for the first time this spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They are raising a type of nordic bee that does well during the cold winters.  They also have heritage breed goat, that several years ago was down to 40 individuals.

They are raising a type of nordic bee that does well during the cold winters. They also have heritage breed goats. Several years ago the entire population in Sweden was down to 40 individuals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Her gardens are circular and flow..

Her gardens are circular and flow..

 

The building in the background will be the guest cabin.

The building in the background will be the guest cabin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We ate homemade bread and nettle soup.

We ate homemade bread and nettle soup.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sofia was a patient teacher and I greatly enjoyed spending the day with them and learning about luffarslöd (the wire art) and their life.  Their goal is for sustainability in all areas.  Their community is rich with like minded folks and when they advertised and had an open meeting this winter they had a large group of new people show up.

Sofia and her work.

Sofia and her work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luffarslöjd traces its roots back to hobos who would make household goods for barter or trade.  Items such as trivits, whisps, bowls, candle holders.  Sofia also makes pictures on wood.  

Tools of the trade

Tools of the trade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This old trivit was found on their farm.

This old trivit was found on their farm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hand closeup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My finished luffarslöjd bowl.

My finished luffarslöjd bowl.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My work in progress

My work in progress

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